Jul 29, 2021
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In the early morning hours of Monday, September 28, 2015, millions of people across Israel looked up to the heavens to witness a historic lunar event, decades in the making.

Tuesday’s rare full lunar eclipse, in which the moon appears red in color, lending the name Blood Moon, was the fourth and final eclipse in a special tetrad cycle. The Blood Moon was visible for little over an hour across the skies of Israel.

This past tetrad has special significance for the Jewish nation and the Land of Israel as each eclipse has occurred a Jewish holiday: Passover of 2014, Sukkot of 2014, Passover of 2015 and now Sukkot of 2015. A Blood Moon tetrad coinciding with the Jewish holidays is an extremely rare event. Only three past tetrad cycles in the last thousand years have fallen out on Jewish holidays.

Here are some spectacular, must see photos of the Sukkot Blood Moon, as seen from around Israel. Let us know in the comments below where you saw the Blood Moon from.

A combination of pictures showing the different stages of the Blood Moon lunar eclipse with the perigee full moon as seen from Israel, September 28, 2015. (Photo: Abed Rahim Khatib/Flash90)

A combination of pictures showing the different stages of the Blood Moon lunar eclipse with the perigee full moon as seen from Israel, September 28, 2015. (Photo: Abed Rahim Khatib/Flash90)

The Blood Moon lunar eclipse as seen in Tel Aviv, September 28, 2015. (Photo: Tomer Neuberg/Flash90)

The Blood Moon lunar eclipse as seen in Tel Aviv, September 28, 2015. (Photo: Tomer Neuberg/Flash90)

View of a full lunar eclipse combined with a so-called supermoon, called a Blood Moon, in Ashkelon, on September 28, 2015. A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon, following its orbit around Earth, passes directly behind our planet as seen from the sun. (Photo: Edi Israel/Flash90)

View of a full lunar eclipse combined with a so-called supermoon, called a Blood Moon, in Ashkelon, on September 28, 2015. A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon, following its orbit around Earth, passes directly behind our planet as seen from the sun. (Photo: Edi Israel/Flash90)