2,600 Year-Old Inscriptions Show Widespread Literacy in Israel

April 15, 2016

2 min read

A new Tel Aviv University study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) suggests there was widespread literacy during the final years of the Kingdom of Judah.

“What were the literacy rates in Judah at the end of the First Temple period?” wonders Prof. Israel Finkelstein of TAU’s Department of Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations, who led the research together with Prof. Eliezer Piasetzky of TAU’s School of Physics and Astronomy.

The interdisciplinary study was conducted by Shira Faigenbaum-Golovin, Arie Shaus and Barak Sober, under the supervision of Prof. Eli Turkel and Prof. David Levin, all of TAU’s Department of Applied Mathematics. Other collaborators included Prof. Nadav Na’aman of TAU’s Department of Jewish History and Prof. Benjamin Sass of TAU’s Department of Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations.

Inscriptions dating to 600 BCE (Photo: Tel Aviv University / JNi Media)
Inscriptions dating to 600 BCE (Photo: Tel Aviv University / JNi Media)

Using cutting-edge computerized image processing and machine learning tools, the TAU team analyzed 16 inscriptions unearthed at an excavation in the remote fort of Arad, and deduced that the texts had been written by at least six authors. The content of the inscriptions disclosed that reading and writing abilities existed throughout the military chain of command, from the highest echelon all the way down to the deputy quartermaster of the fort.

“We designed an algorithm to distinguish between different authors, then composed a statistical mechanism to assess our findings,” said Sober. “Through probability analysis, we eliminated the likelihood that the texts were written by a single author.”

The inscriptions found at Arad consisted of instructions for troop movements and the registration of expenses for food. The tone and nature of the commands precluded the role of professional scribes. Considering the remoteness of Arad, the small garrison stationed there, and the narrow time period of the inscriptions, this finding indicates a high literacy rate within Judah’s administrative apparatus — and provides a suitable background for the composition of a critical mass of biblical texts.

“Literacy existed at all levels of the administrative, military and priestly systems of Judah. Reading and writing were not limited to a tiny elite,” said Prof. Piasetzky.

“Now our job is to extrapolate from Arad to a broader area,” said Prof. Finkelstein. “Adding what we know about Arad to other forts and administrative localities across ancient Judah, we can estimate that many people could read and write during the last phase of the First Temple period

“Following the fall of Judah, there was a large gap in production of Hebrew inscriptions until the second century BCE, the next period with evidence for widespread literacy,” Piasetzky concludes.

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