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While the WHO declares that there is nothing to worry about, China is sealing off entire villages and a man died in New Mexico from a rare form of the plague that once killed off half the world population.

China sealed off several villages in Inner Mongolia in a second attempt to contain the spread of a new outbreak of bubonic plague. A man died in the region’s city of Bayannur from multiple organ failure after contracting the disease. Authorities in Bayannur said: “The place of residence of the deceased is locked down, and a comprehensive epidemiological investigation is being carried out.” Thirty-five contacts of the man have been sent into quarantine. The statement added: “Currently, there is a risk of the human plague spreading in our city.” Last Thursday another person died from circulatory system failure due to infection with bubonic plague.

The World Health Organization (WHO) says it is “carefully monitoring” a case of bubonic plague in China’s northern Inner Mongolia region, but says that it is “not high risk”.

In a seemingly unrelated case, a man in his 20s died of the septicaemic plague in New Mexico last week. This was the second case of septicaemic plague in New Mexico in less after a man in his 60s was diagnosed with bubonic plague in New Mexico’s Santa Fe County last month.

Septicaemic plague is the rarest of the three plague varieties which include bubonic plague. Like bubonic, septicaemic plague is spread by bites from infected fleas or by direct contact with animals. Animals carrying the disease can include rodents, wildlife, and pets. There is also a risk from household pets returning home after being allowed to roam and hunt outside.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), septicaemic plague can be treated promptly with antibiotics. Symptoms include the sudden onset of fever, chills, headache and weakness. In most cases, there is also a painful swelling of the lymph node in the groin, armpit, or neck areas.

Bubonic plague is a highly infectious and often fatal disease. The Bubonic Plague is a dark shadow in China’s collective unconscious. The Third Pandemic is the designation of a major bubonic plague pandemic that began in Yunnan province in China in 1855, spreading to all inhabited continents. Ultimately more than 12 million people died in India and China from the plague. Europe and Asia were hit by three waves of the Bubonic plague resulting in over 200 million deaths. 

The strong reaction to the recent outbreak is understandable. Bubonic plague in the 14th century, also known as the Black Death, was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people in Eurasia and in Europe. If untreated, the disease has a 100 percent mortality rate, and the pneumonic form can be fatal within 12-24 hours.

Bubonic Plague is making a comeback with close to 50,000 human cases being diagnosed in the last two decades. It is now categorized by the World Health Organization as a re-emerging disease. The last outbreak of bubonic plague in the U.S. was in 1924 and was centered in Los Angeles.

An outbreak of Bubonic Plague in Madagascar in 2017 nearly got out of control before the WHO stepped in, delivering nearly 1.2 million doses of antibiotics and released $1.5 million in emergency funds. 

In July, celebrity doctor Dr. Drew Pinsky predicted that Los Angeles was in danger of an outbreak of Bubonic Plague in what he termed an imminent “apocalypse.” Dr. Drew blamed the growing population of homeless people and the lack of a rodent control program. 

The sixth plague in Egypt, boils, may very well have been bubonic plague, whose characteristic symptom is boil-like skin lesions that form black ulcers.

It shall become a fine dust all over the land of Egypt, and cause an inflammation breaking out in boils on man and beast throughout the land of EgyptExodus 9:9

The connection between Bubonic Plague and Egypt was proven in 2010 when scientists traced the plague to ancient Egypt. Ancient cultures lived close to their livestock, and the plague was transferred from the animals by fleas. While exploring ruins in Egypt, Egyptologists found 3,000-year-old remains of Nile rats and used fine sieves to discover the remains of fleas, both carriers of the plague.

The plague of שחין (shechin; boils), as are all the plagues that struck Egypt before the Exodus, is prophesied to return in the end-of-days by Zechariah.

As for those peoples that warred against Yerushalayim, Hashem will smite them with this plague: Their flesh shall rot away while they stand on their feet; their eyes shall rot away in their sockets; and their tongues shall rot away in their mouths. Zechariah 14:12

 


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