Dec 01, 2021
JERUSALEM WEATHER

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Antisemitic graffiti in Klaipėda, Lithuania. (Photo: Beny Shlevich/ Wiki Commons)

Antisemitic graffiti in Klaipėda, Lithuania. (Photo: Beny Shlevich/ Wiki Commons)

Two Jews in France were attacked in separate incidents in France last week.

A Jewish woman, identified as Candace, was assaulted outside a laundromat in a suburb of the French city Lyon.  Her attackers, a mother and daughter, were Arab.

Candace told Maariv daily newspaper that the mother held her down while the daughter punched her repeatedly in the face.  She sustained injuries to her eyes and suffered some hearing loss as a result of the attack.  During the assault, Candace told the paper, the daughter shrieked, “Dirty Jew, go home to your country, Israel.”

She believes she was singled out for the attack because she wore a star of David necklace.  She noted that, to her disappointment, none of the bystanders lifted a finger in her defense throughout the assault, and the police did nothing beyond recording her complaint.

Candace, an American, has lived in France for the past twelve years.  She says she is now afraid to venture beyond the safety of her own home.

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Meanwhile, a 52-year-old Israeli man was tasered by two unknown assailants on last Monday night.  The attack happened outside a building next to a synagogue in the city’s fourth arrondissement, which was once the heart of the Jewish community.  The victim, K. Sassoun, was not injured, but did require medical attention following the incident.  The assailants fled the scene.

An unnamed witness reported the incident to the National Bureau for Vigilance against anti-Semitism, known by its French acronym, BNVCA.

“The perpetrators assaulted the victim for no other reason than his clothing and appearance, which identified him as being Jewish, and the fact that he was near a Jewish place of worship,” BNVCA said in a statement.

During the week prior to these incidents, a group of teenagers hurled stones at a Jewish institution in Sarcelles near Paris and shouted “death to Jews.”  Rocks were also thrown at a school bus of Jewish students in Paris.  As well, several people chanted anti-Semitic slogans at a young Jewish woman near a Jewish studies center in Strasbourg.  One of the chants, “Merah max,” glorified the killer of four Jews in Toulouse in 2012.

Earlier this month, The Service de Protection de la Communauté Juive (Jewish Community Security Service) reported there had been 431 anti-Semitic incidents in France in 2013, a drop of 31% since 2012, but still 8% more than 2011.